Indian_Blogs🇮🇳, Research Study

THISAbility – An Insight in Disabilities.

  • DYSCALCULIA

Meaning:

Dyscalculia is a term referring to a wide range of difficulties with mathematics, including weaknesses in understanding the meaning of numbers, and difficulty applying mathematical principles to solve problems. Dyscalculia is rarely identified early.

Symptoms:

  • difficulty in counting backwards.
  • difficulty in remembering ‘basic’ facts.
  • slow to perform calculations.
  • weak mental arithmetic skills.
  • a poor sense of numbers & estimation.
  • Difficulty in understanding place value.
  • Addition is often the default operation.
  • High levels of mathematics anxiety.

Cure and how to take care of the person:

There are no medications that treat dyscalculia, but there are lots of ways to help kids with this math issue succeed.

  • Multisensory instruction can help kids with dyscalculia understand math concepts.
  • Accommodations, like using manipulatives, and assistive technology can also help kids with dyscalculia.

Learning specialists, educational psychologists, or neuropsychologists who specialize in dyscalculia recommend the following to help a child’s understanding of math:

  • Specially designed teaching plans
  • Math-based learning games
  • Practicing math skills a lot more often than other students

Strategies for Managing Dyscalculia:

  1. Talk or write out a problem. For the Dyscalculia student, math concepts are simply abstract and numbers mere marks on page.
  2. Draw the problem.
  3. Break Tasks Down into subsets.
  4. Use ‘Real Life’ cues and physical objects. 
  5. Review often.

Henry Winkler is an American actor, director and author who has dyslexia and difficulty with math (Dyscalculia).

Mary Tyler Moore was an American actress, producer, and social advocate. She had Dyscalculia because of which she bullied in school. Mary explains that as a child, her academics suffered because she wasn’t able to comprehend class lessons.

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